Tag Archives: chicken

It’s finals week: Procrastinate

Here at Fredonia, it’s finals week. And what better way to fail your exams than procrastination? A lot of times when I get stressed, I need to stop the studying for a little and take a break. I’ve found a great activity that keeps my mind off work is cooking! I will prepare a few meals at a time, time an hour or two to think about something else. Here are some healthy, awesome things you can cook while relaxing for a while!

Stuffed Peppers:

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Ingredients

  • 4 bell peppers (any color)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 8 ounces 90-percent lean ground beef
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup long-grain white rice
  • 1/3 cup brown lentils
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill, parsley or 1/4 teaspoon dried mint

Directions
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Cut the tops off each pepper, reserve them and hollow out the insides of the peppers of any seeds and seed walls. Sprinkle the insides with a pinch salt and a pinch pepper and set aside.

Heat 1 teaspoon of the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat and add the garlic and onions. Cook until softened, 3 minutes, and then add the beef, oregano, cinnamon and cumin. Cook, breaking up the meat with a wooden spoon, until no longer pink. Stir in 1 tablespoon of the tomato paste until it coats the meat and is slightly darkened. Stir in the broth, rice and lentils. Remove from the heat and set aside until the liquid is absorbed and the mixture is cooled slightly. Season with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper.

Divide the filling among the peppers and place the tops back on. Set the peppers upright in a small baking dish, such as an 8-inch square baking dish. Whisk 1 1/2 cups water with the remaining tablespoon of tomato paste and olive oil. Pour into the dish around the peppers. Cover tightly with foil and bake until the peppers are tender and the rice and lentils are cooked through, about 1 hour 15 minutes.

Carefully transfer the peppers to a serving dish and pour the cooking liquid into a medium nonstick skillet. Boil over high heat until the sauce is thickened and reduced to about 1/2 cup. Remove from the heat and add the dill. Season with salt and pepper. Serve the sauce with the stuffed peppers.

Per Serving: Calories: 320; Total Fat; 11 grams; Saturated Fat: 3 grams; Protein: 20 grams; Total carbohydrates: 37 grams; Sugar: 5 grams Fiber: 8 grams; Cholesterol: 37 milligrams; Sodium: 426 milligrams

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/lightened-up-stuffed-peppers-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

 

Low-Cal Fettuccine Alfredo:

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Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup low-fat (2%) milk
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons Neufchtel or low-fat cream cheese
  • 3/4 cup grated parmesan cheese, plus more for topping
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 12 ounces fresh fettuccine
  • Freshly ground pepper

Directions
Make the sauce: Melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and lemon zest and cook until the garlic is slightly soft, about 1 minute. Add in the flour and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon,1 minute. Whisk in the milk and 3/4 teaspoon salt and cook, whisking constantly, until just thickened, about 3 minutes. Add the Neufchatel and parmesan cheese; whisk until melted, about 1 minute. Stir in the chopped parsley.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the fettuccine and cook until al dente, 2 to 3 minutes. Reserve 1 cup cooking water, then drain the pasta and return to the pot.

Add the sauce and 1/2 cup of the reserved cooking water to the pasta and gently toss to combine, adding more cooking water as needed to loosen. Season with salt. Divide among bowls and top with parmesan and pepper.

Per serving: Calories 490; Fat 15 g (Saturated 8 g); Cholesterol 48 mg; Sodium 734 mg; Carbohydrate 66 g; Fiber 3 g; Protein 20 g

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/low-cal-fettuccine-alfredo-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

 

Crispy Baked “Fried” Chicken:

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Ingredients

  • 8 chicken pieces (preferably 2 breasts, 2 thighs, 2 legs and 2 wings)
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 cups cornflakes
  • 2/3 cup buttermilk
  • 2 tablespoons dijon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground sage

Directions
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place a rack in a roasting pan or on a baking sheet.

Rinse the chicken in cold water; pat dry. In a wide bowl or on a plate, season the flour with salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Dredge each chicken piece through the flour so it’s fully coated, tap against the bowl to shake off excess flour and set aside. Discard the flour.

Here comes the part kids like best: Crush the cornflakes by placing them in a big resealable plastic bag, carefully pressing the bag to push out the air. Seal up the bag (with as little air inside as possible) and run over the flakes with a rolling pin. Open the bag and pour the crushed flakes into a wide bowl or onto a plate.

In a large bowl (big enough to dredge the chicken pieces), mix the buttermilk, mustard, cayenne pepper, paprika and sage. Give each floured chicken piece a good buttermilk bath and then roll in the cornflake crumbs.

Arrange the chicken pieces on the rack and place in the hot oven. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes, lower the heat to 375 degrees and cook for another 25 to 30 minutes, until cooked through and crispy. The juices should run clear when the meat is pierced with a knife. Serve with Easy Greens.

Per serving: Calories 520; Fat 22 g (Sat. 6 g; Mono. 9 g; Poly. 5 g); Cholesterol 136 mg; Sodium 1,040 mg; Carbohydrate 41 g; Fiber 1.5 g; Protein 40 g

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/cat-cora/crispy-baked-fried-chicken-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

 

Enjoy, and happy finals everyone!

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Vegetarianism: How it can save the planet

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Yeah, I’m a vegetarian. No, I’m not going to shove my ideas down your throat. But I will tell you how becoming a vegetarian not only helps save the planet, but also 100 animals a year, per person.

Almost 8 years ago, I was a freshman in high school. My English class was doing thesis papers, and my best friend was doing hers on vegetarianism. While I thought it was interesting, it wasn’t until I actually read facts about it that I became genuinely interested. A lover of planet earth and mother nature, I knew that this was something I could do to help out in a small, but impactful way.

What most people don’t realize is that the animals they are eating were not found in nature, they were raised. Somewhere, a massive farm was built on land to raise and house these animals. Fresh water is used in their feeding process. More land is used to harvest hay and other crops to feed these animals. Massive amounts of waste is created by these animals, often placed in areas that can contaminate our own food and drinking water.

I know many people don’t agree with PETA sometimes, but this is a statement by them on the impact of these animals:

“Plainly put, the sheer quantity of animals required to feed people’s taste for meat, dairy products, and eggs makes humane, environmentally responsible practices impossible. Profitability dictates that the meat, dairy, and egg industries crowd the largest number of animals into the smallest space possible, leading to massive water pollution, soil erosion from the amount of crops needed to feed these animals, and other eco-nightmares.”

Though slightly biased, this information is all based on actual fact, which is hard to dispute. Think about these other alarming facts and statistics:

  • Researchers at the University of Chicago concluded that switching from a standard American diet to a vegan diet is more effective in the fight against climate change than switching from a standard American car to a hybrid.

  • A German study conducted in 2008 concluded that a meat-eater’s diet is responsible for more than seven times as much greenhouse-gas emissions as a vegan’s diet is.

  • Producing a little more than 2 pounds of beef causes more greenhouse-gas emissions than driving a car for three hours and uses up more energy than leaving your house lights on for the same period of time.

  • According to scientists at the Smithsonian Institution, seven football fields’ worth of land is bulldozed every minute to create more room for farmed animals and the crops that feed them.

  • Of all the agricultural land in the U.S., 80 percent is used to raise animals for food and grow grain to feed them—that’s almost half the total land mass of the lower 48 states.

  • A study in Texas found that animal feedlots in that state produce more than 7,000 tons of particulate dust every year and that the dust “contains biologically active organisms such as bacteria, mold, and fungi from the feces and the feed.”

  • Farmed animals produce more than 10 times as much excrement as does the entire human population of the United States.

If you’ve been thinking about making the switch to vegetarianism or veganism, let this be even more motivation. Help save your planet in a huge way!

Credit to www.Peta.org for all of this amazing information!

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No more simple salads

No more simple salads

Being a vegetarian, salads are a staple in my diet. Sometimes, however, I get bored and tired of eating them, so I need to change it up. Here is a list of creative, healthy foods you can top your salads with when you’re looking to change it up! Inspiration for this post came from Prevention.

Click on the link below for more put-together salad creations.

Get creative!

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Strawberries

Sundried tomatoes

Roasted red peppers

Banana peppers

Corn

Raspberries

Dried Cranberries

Poppy seeds

Chickpeas

Hard boiled eggs

Cashews

Avacado

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Red grapes

Mandarin oranges

Pomegranate seeds

Scallions

Shrimp

Grilled chicken breast

Tuna

Tofu

Veggie beef/chicken strips

Water chestnuts

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Here is the rest of the article: http://www.prevention.com/print/27336

 

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Handy Portion Control

Thanks to Prevention, I found this super helpful guide to portion control using your hands. This is useful for when you’re cooking and don’t have the proper equipment to measure your foods, or when you’re out on the go. Below is some info from their website, check out the link below for more stuff, too!

Eating the right portion sizes pays off, say Pennsylvania State University scientists, who found out how easily big servings lead to a calories overload. 

On 2 consecutive days in each of 3 weeks, 32 subjects chose as many food portions as they wanted. But the serving portion sizes changed: Regular size portions during week one became 50% larger the second week and doubled during week three. 

Compared with the first week, total daily calories jumped by 335 calories per day for women and 504 calories for men during the second week, and by an astonishing 530 calories for women and 812 calories for men in the last week. 

To make controlling portion sizes super easy, print out this guide and carry it with you until you’ve committed it to memory.  

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Read more: http://www.prevention.com/weight-loss/weight-loss-tips/your-guide-calories-and-portion-sizes#ixzz2OBYnPB9a

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